Application Essay

Posted on: 17th May 2023

Question

Often, it is easier to deal with the world around us just by stereotyping the social narrative that is portrayed. The reason is that we may be hard wired to act this way. Except, more often than not, our attitudes get clouded with ignorance when acting according to our mental categorization and preset labeling causing detrimental output. In a world that is becoming diverse and heterogeneous, stereotyping can be an insidious process. Looking back, many times I thought I didn’t fit the social norms on stereotyping as I played outside the sandbox of conformity.

I carry an attitude of not wanting to be stereotyped. I like to be considered as a free thinker or willing to be heard or maybe because I like being creative or not travel the beaten path. Whatever it is, the aspect of not playing to a preset narrative helped me, by being receptive to innovative ideas and thoughts while working on school projects and assignments, or enjoy listening to a diverse styles of music, or in making friends easily, or displaying empathy when mentoring middle and high schoolers. I admit that stereotyping can serve a useful functionality and can provide a perspective with respect to culture, race, or gender. However, if used as our primary judgmental compass, then we are liable to make erroneous decisions based on inaccurate assessments. There must be a constant self-evaluation and reinforcement not to succumb to conclusions from ignorant social stereotyping.

(Dear Editor, please note: this topic needs to be edited. I welcome your suggestions. Max limit of 250 words)

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Solution

 

Application Essay

Consider the story of the goldfish is a fishbowl. It looks through the water and notices the aquatic life around. Yet when it looks outside, it can hardly conceive of the outside world. While it could notice a few things outside, the goldfish conceptions of the outside worlds were only hypothetical. Like the goldfish, humans tend not to be very different in new situations. I have always been interested in Culture as a form of personal identity, perhaps because I stood out as a sore numb kid during my PE sessions a lot more than my peers. Regardless of what I thought about Culture, it is a vital element of the course of my life in profound ways.

In a world that is becoming diverse and heterogeneous, we are more exposed to much more than we were a few decades back. Today, where most people are immigrants and technology bring together people from different worlds, stereotyping can be an insidious process. In some cases, people rarely speak the same language in social and work gatherings. Growing up, for example, I used to speak Spanish with my parents, my peers. In the meantime, we spoke English at school. That meant my socialization process occurred twice a day. Going by these developments, it is fair to say that one needs to embrace openness and flexibility to behave accordingly in a modern world. I carry an attitude of not wanting to be stereotyped. I like to be considered as a free thinker or willing to be heard or maybe because I like being creative or not travel the beaten path. Whatever it is, the aspect of not playing to a preset narrative helped me, by being receptive to innovative ideas and thoughts while working on school projects and assignments, or enjoy listening to a diverse style of music, or in making friends easily, or displaying empathy when mentoring middle and high schoolers.

I admit that culture can serve a useful functionality and can provide a perspective with respect to language, morals, and appropriate behavior. However, if used as our primary judgmental compass, then we are liable to make erroneous decisions based on inaccurate assessments. There must be a constant self-evaluation and reinforcement not to succumb to conclusions from ignorant social bias.


 

Works Cited

Boyle, Gregory J., et al. "Cross-cultural differences in personality, motivation and cognition in Asian vs. Western societies." Personality and Individual Differences 159 (2020): 109834.

Jordan Barney

Jordan Barney

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